Wind turbines are notorious bird-killers, so why are the RSPB building one?

Clashes between bird conservationists and wind farm supporters first arose in the early eighties, when deaths by collision blackmarked the sustainable energy ‘solution’ as a major threat to larger bird species. Species most at risk are be birds of prey and waterbirds, both of which are more likely to die from collisions, and have lower population growth rates and poorer manoeuvrability in flight. Bird charities such as the RSPB have since campaigned against many wind farm proposals, so why are they now building a turbine in their own headquarters?

Barnacle goose, Branta leucopsis, are particularly vulnerable to collisions

 Since the first wind farms were designed, much effort has been ploughed into reducing their impacts on nature. Whilst deaths of larger bird species are concerning, the RSPB has only objected to around six percent of wind farm applications across the country – the main cause of concern being migration routes.

It is still true that turbines cause fatalities, however studies have shown that, for every bird killed by wind farms, 5820 are killed by striking buildings. The RSPB stress that it is still important to monitor the risk of turbines, and appropriate precautions should be employed – locations away from populations of endangered species should be preferred, and those away from migration routes. Set to arise in Autumn 2013, the RSPB turbine will provide over two thirds of the RSPB’s electricity usage across the UK from its location in Bedfordshire. It will stand as a statement that wind energy, when harnessed appropriately, can be a useful tool in fighting climate change and providing a sustainable future.

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